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FINAL PROJECT

In bringing closure to our course, your final project is an opportunity to deeply consider your theoretical framework about reading in content areas within a philosophical context. Given our class introduction about paradigms, theories, schemas, theoretical frameworks, how does your paradigm connect and reflect with cognitive theories.

Through your readings in our course, your conversations and discussions with your in-class colleagues, your classroom experiences, your own research, our class sessions, hopefully you are in the process of outgrowing your former self or extending yourself. With this in mind, identify the research, theory and beliefs, which support your instructional ideology.

As you read through the theories, consider how readers make meaning from the texts they read and how we as educators support them in this effort.

  • Identify yourself as a proponent of a theory (or theories).

  • Prepare an oral presentation (8 minutes maximum) explaining your theory.

  • Represent (object, illustration, symbol, etc.) your ideas in an original.

Background Vocabulary

Philosophy:Webster's Definition

Theory:Online Dictionaries

Paradigm

List of THEORIES

The Theories

Ways of Knowing: Brain-Based Learning Theory

Celebrities in Cognitive Science

Constructivism Definitions

Constructivism Web Pages

Contributions of Constructivist Position

Constructivism and Related Sites

Constructivism and Education

Constructivist Learning Theory

Learning Theories

Social Cognitive Theory

Reading and Writing: From Theory to Practice

What Does Research Say About Reading

Metadesign

Schema Theory

Schema Theory: Introduction Theory

Situated Learning Theory

Andrew Ortony on Metaphor

Critical Balances: Early Instruction for Lifelong Reading

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Created 25 March 2005

Revised 4 April 2005

by the Author, Frances Vitali