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University of New Mexico

College of Education

LLSS 315* Educating Linguistically Diverse Studens

Fall 2007 | Section 450 | 3cr. hrs. | Rm#: UC-221

Thursdays 1-4pm | Burlington Annex on 30th Street

Instructor, Dr. Frances Vitali

505.566.3480 (unm)

505.324.0894 (home)

Office: #233 Burlington Annex

Office Hours: One hour before and after class or by appointment

Email: unm315@excite.com

Course Blog at http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

 

 

                Mission Statement:  College of Education

                The vision of the college of Education:  Excellence and diversity through people, ideas, and       innovation.

 

                Our mission is the study & practice of education through teaching, research, & service. We

                *              address critical education issues;

                *              test new ideas and approaches to teaching and learning; and

                *              educate professionals who can

                *              facilitate human growth and development in schools, homes, communities and workplaces;

                *              prepare students for participation in a complex and challenging society.

 

                In carrying out our mission, we value

                *              excellence in all that we do;

                *              diversity of people and perspective;

                *              relationships of service, accountability, collaboration, and advocacy;

                *              the discovery, discussion, and dissemination of ideas; and

                *              innovation in teaching, technology, and leadership.

 

“The stories we tell not only explain things to others, they explain them to ourselves.”

(Donald Norman)

“A man’s reach must exceed his grasp or what’s a metaphor?” (Robert Browning in McLuhan, M. Understanding Media: the extensions of man, 1994, p. 85)

 

Course Description

This course familiarizes students with history, theory, practice, culture, politics of second language pedagogy and orality and literacy.  Students will gain an understanding of effective teaching methods and cultural sensitivity for working with linguistically diverse students.

          Rationale: Most classrooms are comprised of uniquely diverse learners on all levels, including linguistically and culturally. As educators, we must learn to be flexible in our thinking, teaching and learning to address, respect, celebrate, and support the richness and complexity of the children we teach.

                Instructional Strategies: Students and instructor will engage in the following ongoing collegial learning interactions: reflective writing; guided reading, reciprocal learning, reflection/communication blog, research case study process, authentic learning, individual conferences, and cooperative and collaborative activities/projects, Literature Circles.

 

Responsibilities

·          Integrate the New Mexico State Competencies for Entry-LevelTeachers into course content.

·          Be professional at all times – in class and in the field.

·          Be receptive to feedback, being reflective while participating in an academic learning community.

·          Engage in collaborating and entering and professional dialogue with educators, students, parents, administrators, support staff working with bilingual students.

·          Engage in learning ASL as a second language as an authentic way of becoming a second language learner.

·          Conduct and present assignments and projects with professional dispositions and ethical manner sufficiently prepared.

·          Take ownership of learning.

 

Textbook/Materials – Available at SJC Bookstore

            Zainuddin, et.al. (2002). Fundamentals of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in K-12 Mainstream Classrooms. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt  (ISBN: 0-7872-9664-3)

           

            Online COURSE BLOG at http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

 

Additional Materials

·          Additional Articles may be provided by instructor and students.

          Supplemental Sources:

·          NCREL Educating Teachers for Diversity (http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/presrvce/pe300.htm)

·          Four Corner’s Storytelling Festival (http://www.infoway.org/storytelling/2007/index.asp)

·          PRIME TIME (http://www.infoway.org/kids/primeTime/primeTime.asp)

·          River of Words Poetry Contest (http://www.riverofwords.org/contest/)

·          Office of English Language Acquisition (http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/)

·          Storytelling Festival (http://www.storytellingfoundation.net/festival/about-fest.htm)

·          IRA NCTE Read.Write.Think Lessons (http://www.readwritethink.org/)

·          San Juan College Calendar of Events | American Meth, Aug. 25, 7pm Little Theater (566-3430)

·          Storytellers of New Mexico (http://www.infoway.org/STNM/index.asp)

·          Veteran History Project: The War by Ken Burns  (http://loc.gov/vets/vets-home.html)

·          Veteran History Project Interview Kit (http://www.loc.gov/vets/kit.html)

·          The Spirit that Moves Us Literature-based resource (See Lois Meyer)

·          Ricky Lee Allen, UNM LLSS Professor, Critical Race Theory

 

Course Learning Invitations and Expectations (Assignments, projects, activities)

Course Requirements:

àRead course blog regularly as a communication tool and post reflections when assigned at

            http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

àRead your email regularly for course updates, reminders and communication in between sessions.

àPost reflections on our class blog page athttp://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315 as needed.

à Each session, we will take turns highlighting the events of the session and posting them to the course blog page under WEEKLY SESSION HIGHLIGHTS.

àCreate your own webpage including philosophy of education and diversity on www.tripod.com free webhosting. Your webpage will house most of your assignments and reflections.

àWork with students on family history projects on specified Mondays during course sessions and outside of class. Participate in Family Oral History Collaboration Project with students sharing along side them in writing conferences - writing, editing, reading, presenting auto/biographical culminating in Book Anthology. (It is possible that we may be working with two schools-Bloomfield and Apache Afterschool Program.)

àCollaborate with Vicki Bruno, American Sign Language (ASL) teacher in speaking ASL with her students in Bloomfield culminating in Poetry Performance (speaking and ASL) with students as a final project (It is possible that we may be working with two schools-Bloomfield and Apache Afterschool Program.)

àGuest Visits by: Kathy Schlapp (Reading Specialist), New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities (NMEH), FMS Bilingual Education Department   

àRead, reflect and discuss course text chapter content and issues with peers and guest visitors.

àParticipate in whole, group and individual classroom activities/projects:

            àà FACILITATE Literature Circles in discussing issues and text chapter content.

àExplore local school communities by providing a Community Profile with photos.

à Compare NM state and national school profiles. (See Meyer handout.)

àAttend at least one PRIME TIME family reading night - times and locations will be provided. Reflection on webpage)

àAttend (volunteer or audience) the Four Corner Storytelling Festival October 12 or 13. Reflection on webpage)

àRead at least one children’s literature book about immigration in conjunction with the current issues inThe Spirit that Moves Us Literature-based resource OR implications for teaching.

àWriting Group conferences will be regularly held to share, edit and refine family oral history and case study writing pieces.

àParticipate in Midterm & Final conferences.

àUse APA style in academic writing (case study, anthology).

àConduct research for Student Ethnography (Case Study)

·          Choose a student (no family member or relative) at and work with on Family Oral History Collaborative Project

 

Activities/Topics

Due

Download Syllabus at Course Blog

http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

August 30

Print your own hard copy

RED APPLE TRANSIT 

 

Post Reflections on COURSE BLOG

http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

Session Scribe

 

Weekly

Family Oral History Project

1. writing,editing, refining, final copies

2. collaborating w/ students

3. Anthology preparation

4. Author Chair

Ongoing throughout semester

With peers and with elementary school children

Nov.27-Dec. 6 -  Anthology Publication process

TBA Author’s Chair or in evening (parents & family invited)

Text Chapter: Part I

& Current newspaper articles

Thursdays in September

see sign-up schedule

Class Discussion/Literature Circles

Text Chapter: Part II/III

 

Thursdays in October 

see sign-up schedule

Paired Presentation: Strategy/Presentation/

Assessment

Text Chapter: Part IV/V

 

Thursdays in  November

see sign-up schedule

Individual Presentation: Strategy/Presentation connected to ASL or Family History Projects

PRIME TIME

Reflection on Your webpage

Week of PRIME TIME  session

Four Corners Storytelling Festival

http://www.infoway.org/storytelling/2007/index.asp

Reflection on Your webpage

Week after October 12-13

ASL Poetry Performance

 (practice inside and outside of class)

 

Reflection on Your webpage

Dec.6 or 13 Tentative date

Immigration Chapter Book Reflections

Book title, author, synopsis and review

On Your Webpage

November 1

Guest Speaker Reflections

Reflection on Your webpage

Due week following presentation

Ethnographic Case Study

 

APA Style

September-November according to due dates

Sept. 13-Nov. 15

Community Profile – due Sept. 13

Academic History – due Sept. 20

Themes – due  Oct. 25

Interpretation/Reflection –due Nov. 1

Researcher’s Chair – due Nov. 8, 15

Local Community/School Profile

Sept. 27

Work at home project

Midterm semester Course reflections

October 15

Your webpage

Final  semester Course reflections

(add to your CD-ROM professional portfolio)

Dec. 6

Your webpage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

                Midterm and final individual conferences will be held.     

A

Exemplary completion of all Learning Invitations with adherence to all timelines. Evidence of significant development across the five dimensions of learning and course strands.

B

Satisfactory completion of all Learning Invitations. Evidence of acceptable development across the five dimensions of learning and course strands.

 

 

 

 

 

INCOMPLETE GRADES WILL BE CONSIDERED ONLY IN EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES.

 

Attendance Policy; Silence cell phones out of respect for all learners.

            Attendance is required for each class session. Arrive on time to allow classes to begin (and end) at their scheduled times.  Attendance is a crucial and considered your professional responsibility.  Communication with instructor via email, phone or in person is considered proper professional and respectful etiquette. Lateness and leaving early are considered serious interferences with your progress in this class. Thus, you should come to all classes well prepared to assume an active and thoughtful role in the scheduled activities by having read all required readings and completed all class assignments. Attending all classes is for your benefit to fully experience and appreciate the world of children's literature. And further more, we will miss you and your contributions during our time together.

Please rearrange work and appointment schedules so that you can attend each session.

If you are absent more than two times this semester, you can be dropped from the course.

“The reporting of absences does not relieve the student of responsibility for missed assignment, exams, etc.  The student is required to take the initiative in arranging to make up missed work, and it is expected that faculty will cooperate with the student in reasonable arrangements in this regard” (UNM Pathfinder).

 

It is responsible and respectful to contact instructor or leave message with Dawn in the UNM office if you are going to be late or absent from class. It is also your responsibility to check in with the instructor and consult with a class peer after the missed class for all makes up work.

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Accommodation Statement

            The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for a reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you have a disability requiring accommodation, please contact the instructor as soon as possible to make arrangements.

 

Plagiarism Statement

            Plagiarism is the presentation as original work by a writer of ideas, words, or thoughts belonging to someone else. You must provide a reference not indicating the source of any specific words borrowed from another source. Any project containing incidents of plagiarism will receive no credit or grade. Plagiarism is a serious offense in any college course and can lead to failure in that course or expulsion from UNM.

 

Accreditation Information

        The College of Education is an NCATE accredited institution.  NCATE stands for “National Counsel for Accreditation of Teacher Education” (http://www.ncate.org).  All COE courses address specific NCATE and professional society guidelines and support the College of Education’s Vision, Mission and Conceptual Framework.  I encourage you to learn about and spend some time thinking about the College of Education’s Vision and Mission Statements. 

 

 

 

Text Box: New Mexico Public Education  Department

 

Vision: A world-class educational system
in which all New Mexico students
are prepared to succeed in a diverse
and ever increasingly complex world.

Mission: To provide leadership, technical assistance and quality assurance
to improve performance for all students
and close the achievement gap. 

 

LLSS 315        FALL 2007

Tentative Course Schedule

 

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 

Literature Circle Readings:

1. America Street Story Anthology by Anne Mazer

2. Color of Water by James McBride

3. Prince of the Pond by Donna Jo Napoli

Trip on Red Apple Transit-Observations & Reflections

DOWNLOAD Course Syllabus from http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

Reconceptualist are you?

Current Issues Jigsaw

Culture & Nacirema

Barnga Game

Introduction stories, Name poems – Writing Groups

SJC SMART LAB Computer Lab-Email your tripod webpage URL to me at unm315@excite.com

Who Are You: Family Oral History Collaboration Project

See Resource: Creating Family Timelines (http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=870)

Writing Group Conferences

Video: Valuing Diversity multicultural communication

          Do You Speak American?

          Literature Circles-Harvey Daniels

Course TEXT: PART I Multicultural Issues (chapters 1-8) – Literature Circle group dialogue

Ethnographic Case Study Introduction & Introductory Letter & Permission Form

Local School/Community Profiles

School visitation Introductions (ASL/Poetry/Case Study):

1. Begin collaborating with Vicki Bruner | 2. Meet Valeria Lee and Apache Afterschool Program students

It is possible that we may be working with two schools-Bloomfield and Apache Afterschool Program

 

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

Literature Circle Readings:

1. America Street Story Anthology

2. Color of Water

3. Prince of the Pond

Course TEXT: PART I Multicultural Issues (chapters 1-8) - Literature Circle group dialogue

Video: Race Matters

Intercultural Communication

Ethnographic Case Study: Data Collection/Analysis/Themes/Interpretation/Reflection

NM & National School District Community profile comparison (see Meyer handout)

Family History Collaboration/Writing Group Conferences

ASL with Vicki Bruno & Poetry Collaboration | Afterschool Program with Valeria Lee

Introduce your case study student

No Class: September 20 – Work at home on webpage, case study, or Community Profile

 

 

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER

Literature Circle Readings:

1. America Street Story Anthology

2. Color of Water

3. Prince of the Pond

October 15 Midterm Conferences (complete your written five dimensions and four strands midterm summary and evaluation and download to your webpage)

315 Course TEXT: PART II/III: Principles & Practices (chapters 9-13) - Weekly Paired Presentations

                      PART IV/V: Development & Instruction (chapters 14-24) – Incorporate lesson content in with ASL                                      experience, Family Oral History Project OR your Immigration book.

Ethnographic Case Studies (10-15 minutes) class presentations (November 8, 15)

Writing Group Conferences

Who Are You: Family Oral History Collaboration Project Book ANTHOLOGY compilation, design & publication process

 

DECEMBER

Who Are You: Family Oral History Collaboration Project Book ANTHOLOGY Author’s Chair

ASL & Poetry Collaboration | Afterschool Program Family History Collaboration TBA

Web Page Presentations (December 3)

Final Conferences (December 3)

Final Exam, optional, as needed (December 10)

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ETHNOGRAPHIC CASE STUDY  (UNM San Juan Center LLSS 315/395)

 

As a researcher your goal will be to try to see and perceive the world through the student’s eyes and experiences. Your anecdotal notes and journaling will guide you to identify themes, events, situations, people that motivate, challenge, inspire this child, eventually leading to how can we teach effectively for the child to learn successfully. Your goal in writing an ethnographic case study will be to observe different language learners-monolingual, bilingual, non-speaking (ASL), or communication disorders in various settings. Recording reflections of what you see, think and questions raised when observing, interviewing, transcribing your notes and reflecting about student, family members, and teachers. In your case study, please use initials or alias names for participants.

 

A.  INFORMATION GATHERING PROCESS:

 

Objective: Conducting field research with a child you are trying to relate to and understand by listening carefully to what you see, hear and feel; looking for significant details in what you see, hear and feel; and systematically organizing the process and product. It is also imperative that you look beyond the classroom setting in understanding your child. Interviews with parents, family members as well as teachers and community members will provide a more comprehensive profile of who this child is.

 

Methodology: (Ethnography means learning from people)

Gather, Organize, Reflect and Synthesize Data

Need a returned permission form (provided by instructor) signed by parent, student, principal (optional), instructor and researcher.

 

Phase I: Anecdotal Notes & Reflection

·        Observe student’s family and community, the school, the classroom(s), and the student. Take notes on what you observe (field notes) and make notes of your reflections/impressions. You can accomplish this by using a parallel journal format (see below). Try to see life through their eyes and ask questions. Let your curiosity (while being sensitive) lead your way. Try to suspend your own beliefs, attitudes, assumptions.

 

Location : PVHS Date 8/23/05

Date: 8/23/06

Observation

Reflection

Bernardo is in the school library on the computer. He is on yahoo’s teen chatroom where he seems to be chatting online.

 

 

 

_____________

I asked Bernardo if he likes to chat and he said he does because he thinks it helps him with his learning of the English language.

 

Bernardo talked about some of his chatroom buddies. I asked him if I could include some of his conversations in this research.

 

 Bernardo printed out chatroom conversations with a friend from Ethiopia and PVHS today.

I wish I could see who he is chatting with.

 

How come these chatrooms are so popular?

Sometimes it is hard to understand Bernardo’s broken English and I am not sure if I totally understand what he is saying. That is why I need to constantly restate what I think he is saying when conversing with him.

__________________

Bernardo is sociable. He enjoys talking and expressing himself even though he is not confident speaking English. He wants to become a  better English speaker and his own desire and motivation is his greatest incentive.

 

Need to find out more about chatrooms-Myspace

 

B. seems to feel part of this research

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        (Formal or informal Interviews): Interview student, parent, family, teacher, principal, etc. Involve your student/family in helping you gather information about them-assignments, writing, hobbies, photos, etc.

·        Data includes charts, maps, sketches, photos, brochures, other concrete visual or written materials

·        Data triangulation: using more than one method of gathering data (interviews, direct observations, artifacts

·        Capturing the richness of quotes from parents, teachers, and student is important so you can use their words in the retelling of your story.

 

Phase II : When Data becomes Information

·         Emerging Themes-What threads of discovery emerged in the process? What did you learn that will make a definite impact on how you will teach this child differently or with more sensitivity or awareness?

 

Reflections: reflect on the meaning and implications of your observations, trying to understand things from the student’s experience and perspectives. What do you THINK and what do you KNOW? Ask more questions for clarification if and when necessary. Questions are what guides this inquiry.

 

·         How will you choose to tell the student’s story? This narrative will be your gift to the student and family for allowing you to learn from them. Give thought to how you want to tell your student’s story. Consider style, voice, perspective-all aspects of sharing a compelling story. This narrative will give others a sneak preview into the life of your student.

 

            Phase III: Interpretation/Reflection

·        Your reflections on the process of learning about your student and what you learned in the process.

 

      Reminders: When you talk and write about your student be aware of how you are depicting them, checking to make sure your words and descriptions are well-chosen, thoughtful and sensitive. Remember that authenticity will be preserved when you use quotes, phrases and language from your student and parents’ voice.  In other words, do not tell us about your student; as let them tell it though their own words and voice. This is an academic piece of work that could be included in your professional portfolio and added to your UNM CD-ROM program course collection/reflection.

 

B. FINAL NARRATIVE will include:

 

1.à        Community Profile

                                                                                                

                2.à        Student Academic History of student [Backstory/background information - Literacy and other academic subjects, learning history]

                3. à       THEMES: emerging from your data collection and analysis [such as students who have differences in communication styles across cultures causing                 misunderstandings; do not seem to participate; how communication takes place; cultural barriers; linguistic concerns; family concerns; how students              communicate with each other; effective use of teaching techniques and teaching models, socio-economic issues, cultural misunderstandings]

                                 

                4. à       INTERPRETATION: What these themes mean

                5. à       REFLECTION: Your own reflection of the process and what you learned

 

C. Oral Presentation:

      à       Researcher’s Chair: Present Case Study (approx. 15-20 minutes – November 8, 15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Strands and Dimensions of Learning

as correlated with UNM Conceptual Framework (Understanding, Practice, Professional Identity)

 

Means of interpreting and assessing student achievement will involve Course Strands and Dimensions of Learning.

 

Course Strands

1. communication   2. research/content  3.  technology, and  4. collaboration

components describing your development as readers, writers, and users of technology.

Five Dimensions of Learning

 

Confidence and Independence (Understanding)
Confidence and independence in your own reading, writing, and thinking abilities. We see growth and development when learners' confidence and independence become coordinated with their actual abilities and skills, content knowledge, use of experience, and reflectiveness about their own learning. The overconfident student learns to ask for help when facing an obstacle; the shy student begins to trust her own abilities and begins to work alone at times, or to insist on presenting her own point of view in discussion. In both cases, students develop along the dimension of confidence and independence.

Skills and Strategies (Practice)
Specific skills and strategies involved in composing and communicating effectively, from concept to organization to polishing grammar and correctness, and including technological skills for computer communication and adherence to APA style. Skills and strategies represent the "know-how" aspect of learning. When we speak of "performance" or "mastery," we generally mean that learners have developed skills and strategies to function successfully in certain situations. In this course, it will be communicating as pre-service educators in wrapping your own ideas and questions around what educating linguistically diverse children means and how as professionals we can meet their diverse needs in a classroom.

Knowledge Content (Understanding)
Knowledge content refer to the "content" knowledge you gained about this course, communication technologies for expression. Knowledge and understanding is the most familiar dimension, focusing on the "know-what" aspect of learning. What do I know about this content and how can I extend my learning on different levels? What is my professional role in nurturing a diverse learning environment in my classroom?

Use of Prior and Emerging Experience (Understanding)
The use of prior and emerging experience involves the ability to draw on your own experience and connect it to your work. A crucial but often unrecognized dimension of learning is the ability to make use of prior experience as well as emerging experience in new situations. It is necessary to observe learners over a period of time while they engage in a variety of activities in order to account for the development of this important capability, which is at the heart of creative thinking and its application. In focusing, reflecting and designing our own research proposal and agenda, our prior experience might be tapped to help scaffold new understandings, or consider how ongoing experience shapes the content knowledge or skills and strategies we are developing.

Critical Reflection (Understanding, Practice, Professional Identity)
Reflection refers to your developing awareness of our own learning process, as well as more analytical approaches to reading, writing, and communication. When we speak of reflection as a crucial component of learning, we are not using the term in its commonsense meaning of reverie or abstract introspection. We are referring to the development of your ability to step back and consider a situation critically and analytically, with growing insight into your own learning processes, a kind of metacognition. Have I explored my own personal biases and prejudices and know my own family

It is important that you are made aware of the course strands and the five dimensions of learning because the ownership of your learning in relation to this course content is a focus of your assessment and evaluation. This evaluative process provides a framework with which you can evaluate your own growth. As learners, you are measuring your own learning given the strands and dimensions, considering them in relation to your prior learning. In assessing your progress, you will provide a midterm and final reflection which will be posted on your webpage. See Guideline below:

 

LLSS 315/593    EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT GUIDELINE

 

Midterm Summary

Summary interpretation of observations and evidence in terms of the four major strands of work and the five dimensions of learning.

1.      Four major strands of work: communication, research, technology, and collaboration

2.      Five dimensions of learning:

  • confidence and independence
  • knowledge content
  • skills and strategies
  • use of prior and emerging experience
  • reflectiveness (critical awareness)

 

Midterm evaluation

  • Estimated evaluation in terms of grade
  • Suggestions for your own further development during remainder of semester
  • Suggestions for class activities or for the professor to better support learning

________________________________________________

 

Final Summary

 Summary interpretation of observations and evidence covering the whole semester in terms of the four major strands of work and the five dimensions of learning. Be sure to connect your interpretations with specific examples included in the observations and samples of work.

 

1.      Four major strands of work: communication, research, technology, and collaboration

2.      Five dimensions of learning:

  • confidence and independence
  • knowledge content
  • skills and strategies
  • use of prior and emerging experience
  • reflectiveness (critical awareness)

 

Final evaluation

  • Reflections on semester's learning experience
  • Any suggestions for the professor for future classes
  • Estimated evaluation in terms of grade

 

PROVIDE WRITTEN MIDTERM & FINAL SUMMARIES AND EVALUATIONS at CONFERENCES as well as downloading to your webpage.

 


CHECKLIST OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

LLSS 315 EDUCATING LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS  FALL 2007

Activities/Topics

Format

Due

Completed    a

Comments

Download Syllabus at Course Blog

http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

Print your own hard copy

August 30

 

 

RED APPLE TRANSIT  Blog Reflections

 

COURSE BLOG

http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

August 30

 

 

Session Scribe

COURSE BLOG

http://unm-farmington.tripod.com/315

Before next class session

 

 

Family Oral History Project

1. writing,editing, refining, final copies

2. collaborating w/ students

3. Anthology preparation

4. Author Chair

Ongoing throughout semester

With peers and with elementary school children Nov.27-Dec. 6 Publication process

TBA Author’s Chair or in evening (parents & family invited)

Dec.6, 13

 

 

Text Chapter: Part I

& Current newspaper articles

Class Discussion/Literature Circles

Thursdays in  September

see sign-up schedule

 

 

Text Chapter: Part II/III

 

Paired Presentation: Strategy/Presentation/

Assessment

Thursdays in October 

see sign-up schedule

 

 

 

Text Chapter: Part IV/V

 

Individual Presentation: Strategy/Presentation connected to ASL or Family History Projects

Thursdays in  November

see sign-up schedule

 

 

PRIME TIME

Reflection on Your webpage

Week of PRIME TIME  session

 

 

Four Corners Storytelling Festival

http://www.infoway.org/storytelling/2007/index.asp

Reflection on Your webpage

Week after October 12-13

 

 

Immigration Chapter Book Reflections

Book title, author, synopsis and review

On Your Webpage

November 1

 

 

Guest Speaker Reflections

Reflection on Your webpage

Due week following presentation

 

 

ASL Poetry Performance

Performance (practice inside and outside of class)

December 6 or 13 (Tentative)

 

 

Ethnographic Case Study

 

 

APA Style

Community Profile – due Sept. 13

Academic History – due Sept. 20

Themes – due  Oct. 25

Interpretation/Reflection –due Nov. 1

Researcher’s Chair – due Nov. 8, 15

September-November according to due dates

Sept. 13-Nov. 15

 

 

Local Community/School Profile

Work at home project

Sept. 27

 

 

Midterm semester Course reflections

Your Webpage

October 15

 

 

Final  semester Course reflections

(add to your CD-ROM professional portfolio)

Your webpage

Dec. 6, 13